Don’t Spend Money You Haven’t Earned

It is that time of year again, when we gather with friends and family around a large feast and discuss why we are thankful. While you take this much needed time for reflection, know that there is a well-developed plot against you that is about to unfold. It is what many Americans have come to know as Black Friday. Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving that marks what some say is the official start of the holiday shopping seasoning. The term “black” refers to retailers making a profit or “being in the black”.  The day was designed to separate you from your money.

Studies have shown that Black Friday is one of the busiest shopping days of the year. According to the National Retail Federation,  in 2013 consumers spent $57.4 billion dollars during the Black Friday weekend. What makes Black Friday so different from the other 364 days of the year? The lure of rock bottom prices, steals and deals that retailers claim you will only see on this one day. People line up and camp out at stores, hours even days before the Friday store opening, to ensure their chances to purchase that “must-have”.

I am not sure if this is capitalism at its best or at its worst. I don’t think I need to say (but I will), that $57.4 billion dollars is a heck of a lot of money. I wonder how much of that was actual money that consumers had versus credit they used. I know it is easy to be lured in and to think that you are actually saving money with Black Friday deals, however it is only a deal if you have the money to make the purchase.

Get out of the habit of spending money that you have yet to earn. That is exactly what is happening when you use credit cards with the intention of paying them off at a later date. After paying the interest that accrued, I guarantee you that the purchase wasn’t much of a bargain when it is all said and done.

I say this from experience because I would shop on Black Friday religiously, and used my credit cards without hesitation. I would swipe my cards without any immediate consequences and rave about the money I “saved”. Once I received the credit card bills, reality set in. I, like many other credit card holders, didn’t have the money to pay off my balances. I then struggled to figure out how to pay these new bills with my existing expenses.

As the saying goes, “When you know better, you do better”. I no longer make this common financial mistake.

Going into debt to get more “stuff” simply isn’t worth it. Being able to sleep at night without financial worries, is far more valuable than the last electronic or a new pair of jeans.

Remember, if it is not in your budget, you can’t afford it.

Happy Holidays and remember to be financially responsible!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s